Share, Share, Share

Social media concept“These are the things I learned (in Kindergarten):
1. Share everything…
16. And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first workd you learned – the biggest word of all – LOOK.”
― Robert Fulghum, in All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

We learn from others. When we share it often requires us to reflect on our own understanding and practice about learning, teaching and leadership.  It clarifies our thinking, extends its reach and connects us to others. When we share, we expose part of who we are, we become vulnerable and what makes us human is revealed. Sharing our thinking creates a connection. Sharing allows us to be in a space of community together. I learned about the importance of sharing from other leaders in education, Dean Shareski, George Couros, Alec Couros and many more influential thought leaders that echoed the same maxim: Share, share, share.

Occasionally, I have invited other educators to write a guest post for me because they have something significant to say or I feel they have led an endeavour from which  we could all learn. Sometimes they decline. They are not ready to share yet because they do not feel that their work is finished, proven or successful. For me, sharing isn’t about identifying that we have reached an endpoint or perfection but that we have started a journey. I am not looking for exemplars of perfection but for those that are creating a learning lab for themselves and their students. Those learning labs and unfinished experiences create inspiration for others to grow in their learning as well.

We are getting better in our district at sharing our unfinished journeys. We are  willing to take risks to blog, tweet and even share in front of large crowds. Kudos to those that are stepping up to take those kinds of risks in front of a global audience. At our February Engaging the Digital Learner Series, we had five participants step up to tell their story in the form of an Ignite. We share their Ignite and their learning here. We hope you take a look!

Watch as Principal Iram Khan shares about Minecraft Mania:

New teacher Sarah Dalzell describes her No Stress story:

Suminder Singh, Tamanawis Math Department Head, challenges our notions of traditional instruction with a learning design that changes the structure and tools of learning through Vertical Spacing:


Sean and Vivian Yin, grade 6 Berkshire Park Elementary students, share Creativity in the Makerspace:

What is the impact when we share our learning? I can tell you. After Suminder’s talk, a teacher at White Rock Elementary promptly stripped her walls and windows to set them up so she too could experiment with Vertical Spacing in her class. The twins gave us a window into seeing how the experience of “playing” in a makerspace context had shaped their learning and allowed them to be creative. Their presentation was met with a resounding standing ovation. No wonder–10 year olds telling their story in front of 280 educators! The very next day, I had emails requesting more information on Makerspaces kits. Some principals even arranged to obtain kits for their teachers or for a teacher to spend a half-day visiting a site with a Makerspace in active operation. We now even have someone lined up to talk to us about the impact of exploring Minecraft in their class (stay tuned for more). And as I indicated in my introduction to Sarah Dalzell’s Ignite, her influence reached out beyond our walls to influence a young adult to pursue a future in education. Share, share, share.

We were also fortunate to be entertained, uplifted and challenged by Myron Dueck, author of Grading Smarter, Not Harder. He spoke to us about Creativity and Assessment. For me personally. I found his presentation encouraging and I appreciated having the opportunity to laugh as well. When he gave us real examples of assignments that students had completed that incorporated creativity, it was truly inspiring. I saw learning that I wanted my own children to experience. I encourage you to watch him here.

In the spirit of sharing our journey as learners, educators and a district, we hope you find these Ignites and our Keynote presenter helpful to your own growth. Perhaps you can use a clip from the Keynote, or show one of these Ignites at at staff or department meeting or workshop session as a potential discussion starter. I hope they create some inspiration!

Author’s Note: Special thanks to all our presenters for sharing their story. So nice to know that these presentations had an impact on changing practice in classrooms and on improving the learning experiences for students across our system. We look forward to more inspiration on March 23rd!

2 responses to “Share, Share, Share

  1. Margaret Westaway

    Hi Elisa, I just love learning about all the exciting things happening in our school district. For those interested, the Minecraft workshop is now on the hub!

    • innovativelearningdesigns

      Thanks Margaret. It really is amazing when we can see virtually how teachers and students are teaching and learning. No more isolated playing in our own little sandboxes. We are sharing and providing a window for others into the classroom–that makes all the difference.

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