Tag Archives: Pat Horstead

I still want the revolution


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“I still want the revolution. I want things to be different.”

Sharon Jeroski, Horizons Research, MOE Curriculum Transformation Lead


The change and transformation is really not about curriculum. It is actually about how we engage students in learning & what we do in classrooms with our students.

A B.C. Teacher’s feedback on MOE Curriculum Transformation

The opportunity to learn directly from those engaged in the Ministry of Education’s (MOE) curriculum change process is helpful in setting direction for future priorities. Over the past month I have had the opportunity to learn from several of those playing a lead role in the development of the framework, the curriculum and the assessment components. I share here some of their thinking along with a few of their slide decks.

iStock_000018582567XSmallAt the request of the MOE, Pat Horstead, Assistant Superintendent for Surrey gave a workshop on the Curriculum Transformation. Pat has been an integral part of the development of the new curriculum, shepherding advisory groups and providing advice throughout its development. Last fall she completed a partial secondment to work directly on the MOE curriculum framework. She provided participants with an update on where we are today and where to next (see slidedeck below). Pat highlighted the positive feedback from stakeholder groups and the current status of subject-specific curriculum currently in development. She emphasized the need to focus on Formative Assessment and noted that the MOE Assessment Framework was still a work-in-progress. She encouraged districts to develop new structures for learning, to support and create networks of innovation and to encourage curriculum teacher-leaders to create exemplars of transformation in their classrooms. The Ministry is looking for examples of classrooms where teachers are putting the new curriculum into action. The MOE hopes to include video vignettes on their website so others can see how this transformation changes learning and teaching. One of the most significant comments from Pat, and as a teacher noted in the quote at the top of this post, was the reminder that, “this change is not about implementation but about transformation.”

Jan Unwin, Superintendent of Graduation and Transitions, and Larry Espe, Superintendent of Trades and Transitions, both working for the MOE, provided an overview of the direction of the new Graduation program. Jan spoke to the ongoing commitment to quality teaching and learning that is a pillar of what we do as educators. The notion of flexibility and choice has received a renewed emphasis as a reflection of the feedback that came from students themselves. Their three big words: Passion, Purpose and Personalized. Jan was also explicit in identifying the “new game in town—the whole power of technology.” She identified learning empowered by technology as still viewed as one of the key pillars from the BCED Plan.

How will we know how we are doing? A large group of stakeholders (AGPA) is looking at a way to provide provincial assessments that serve schools and districts with useful information. Ultimately the goal is for these assessments to serve teachers and students. Jan spoke to the notion of a renewed role for assessment where it reflects real life and on-going learning rather than an autopsy of findings. She was also clear that “one of the biggest things that needs to change is around reporting.” What was perhaps most encouraging was their reference to a capstone project and the possibilities of a digital portfolio that can provide actual examples of student work to post-secondary institutions and future employers. The slide on a student’s potential Capstone Project, and Jan’s demonstration of how the buttons click to take you to samples of student work in their portfolios, was very impressive (see slides 50-58 specifically). Please remember, though, this is just a draft of possibilities. The MOE remains committed to getting ongoing feedback to help shape this plan.

Larry Espe shared with us this wonderful and inspiring video as part of their joint presentation.

Sharon Jeroski, of Horizon Research, focused on the core competencies. “All of the competency work is happening somewhere in B.C. We need to talk about it a lot. We need to share, share, share.” She described the new B.C. Curriculum Framework as focused on three essential components: Literacy & Numeracy Foundations, Core Competencies, and Essential Concepts & Content for Deeper Learning. It was the core competencies—Thinking, Communicating, Personal & Social Competence, she emphasized as “the glue that holds the whole system together.” Her slide presentation from her recent Surrey visit is included below:

Her central challenge to us all was the question, “What kind of neighbour do you want?” She encouraged us to give our learners the opportunities to develop the competencies that make a good neighbour. We then might be able to join in with Mr. Roger’s and say, “Won’t you be my neighbour?”

Note: Special thanks to Pat Horstead, Jan Unwin, Larry Espe and Sharon Jeroski for sharing their thinking with us and encouraging us on the road to transformation.

In the Land of Possibilities

 

Education is facing some important questions and exploring ways that ensure our students have the very best chance to be successful in the world and the society that lays ahead–a world we can’t even begin to imagine.

One of the questions we need to ask is if the present curriculum, the way it is presently constructed, is serving our teachers and our students well?  Or, is there some ways that we can construct, organize and imagine curriculum so that it allows for the flexibility and choice that better meets the needs of teachers and students?  Perhaps, it is time to transform curriculum and organize and construct it in a way that allows teachers to better teach to students’ needs and shape curriculum to better fit the contexts of their community.  Perhaps curriculum might not only support students in developing the important skills, processes and competencies but also fully encourage them to delve into and explore their passions.

We are all wondering what the changes and transformation to curriculum in B.C. might look like?  While students were lining up to head back into class the first day of school, we at the Head Office were learning about some of the possibilities. Pat Horstead, Assistant Superintendent, and on the Ministry of Education’s Curriculum Advisory Team, was presenting the overarching conceptual framework and “big ideas” behind these changes.  Her slideshare below provides a solid overview.

 

One of the first key ideas that Pat was clear about is that we are working “In the Land of Possibilities.” These changes are being explored, discussed, modified and adapted constantly as input and feedback is provided by many academics, teachers, principals, district staff and parents. It is about creating the possible and the ideal and making it real for both students and teachers.  Many of us are aware it is a work in progress as at least five of Surrey’s Helping Teachers were in Victoria for several days with different teams during the summer working on exploring possibilities and ways to better capture the important big ideas of their disciplines: Math, Science, Physical Education, Health and Career and Fine Arts curriculum. When they arrived back to work in September these teachers were excited about the curriculum changes and thrilled to be playing a key role in providing their expertise and input into the future direction of B.C.’s curriculum transformation. We look forward to entering the land of possibilities.

You can find out more about these changes in the document, Innovation: Transforming Curriculum and Assessment.

Thank you to Pat Horstead, Assistant Superintendent, for her contributions and editorial assistance with this post.